Glen Campbell’s health troubles have been well documented and his ultimate passing at 81 was not unexpected, but it stings nevertheless. Here are a couple of thoughts from The New Yorker:

He sang in a clear voice that was particularly well-suited to songs of compromise—anything that betrayed all the strange negotiations we allow in order to move deeper into the lives we want. His dexterity with a guitar—he is an agile, artful picker—never seemed to wane.

Dexterity is definitely one way to put it. Check out this compilation of often blistering, always tasteful solos:

Read more from the Times right here.

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No, not tiny aircraft, though … those might make a nice accompantiment too.

“Of all harmonic devices, it [a drone] is not only the simplest, but probably also the most fertile,” says musicologist Peter van der Merwe. I don’t know much about him, but the sentiment goes right along with this clip. Here I’m making it up on the fly against the backdrop of a single C# note. Chord progressions can spark ideas for improvisation: Not only does a series of chords indicate a key, it gives you something to react to. With a drone, it’s all on you.

If you saw our recent Steve Vai post, then you may already be hip to Make Weird Music. But check it out: MWM auteur Anthony Garone himself … makes weird music. Badass weird music with ripping guitar, as a matter of fact. Click below to check out the track “Three Legged Dog” that also features drummer Morgan Ågren, bassist John Landy and fellow guitarist Jan Zehrfeld. (Need more incentive? Mr. Vai himself said, “That track is insane. It certainly stands true to the title of the site.”) (Also, don’t miss the righteous Magma poster behind Morgan Ågren.)

In a new (scratch that—it’s from 2016 but shared on social media … still going to write about it) Guitar World Q&A, Todd Rundgren discusses the notorious psychedelically adorned SG nicknamed “The Fool,” which had belonged to Eric Clapton. Did you know he didn’t obtain it directly from Clapton?

(I)t went through a number of hands before I got it. I think he gave it to George Harrison, and I’d heard that Paul Kossoff from Free owned it, too. I got it from Jackie Lomax, who was signed to Apple.

Does he still use it? Well … no:

I played it for decades, and I owned it until the mid-Nineties. I owed the IRS a lot of money, so I auctioned it off.

Read more at GW, including what is Rundgren’s most prized guitar.

Right here.

 

Guitar maker Sankey’s Bast model is on display at Guitarz. The headless instrument has an otherworldly look and its construction isn’t exactly run-of-the-mill either. Per Guitarz:

The seven piece neck is made of layers of ebony, cocobolo, and purple heart. This was done for stability in the Californian desert climate, but it also looks fantastic.

Read more and see some great pics at the killer Guitarz blog.

Right here.

John Abercrombie and Ralph Towner take us on a 13 minute improvised trip.

Here’s a great package recently featured on the absurdly robust Make Weird Music site. MWM mastermind Anthony Garone and guitar electronics guru Ed Heisler had the opportunity to install the latter’s Mad Hatter SVST-HSH Terminator Kit into Steve Vai‘s signature Ibanez JEM, the guitar named Evo. Like … the real Evo itself. Here’s what Anthony had to say about the handoff:

It was a little nerve-wracking leaving the venue with one of the most valuable guitars on the planet. I joked with Ed that I would rather Steve handed us a bag with 1 million dollars cash because cash is replaceable. I think Ed double-checked his homeowner’s insurance after he brought EVO home.

Yeah, no shit.

mwm_vai

“It’s like Evo has a bigger set of lungs.”

If you head over to MWM you can watch a mini documentary which chronicles the work done and reveals incredible details of the iconic axe inside and out. It’s a real treat for Vai fans and guitar tech wonks. Go see it all.

Right here.