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CLIVE, Iowa, 03.12.15 – Slipknot guitarist Mick Thomson (“Number Seven,” if you’re scoring at home) was hospitalized owing to (wait for it) a knife fight. Let’s let Guitar World handle this:

Thomson, 41, and his younger brother, Andrew, 35, were taken to a local hospital in separate ambulances after the altercation, which took place in the front garden of the guitarist’s home.

Boys will be boys. Apparently the neither of the Thomson brothers sustained life-threatening injuries. Slipknot is breaking from a tour which is set to resume in Florida in April.

Read more at GW.

Right here.

As I’ve noted variously at the Pointy Guitar Facebook and Twitter pages, the most viewed ad in the site’s history is one for the Washburn Wonderbar Tremolo System, as scanned from Guitar for the Practicing Musician, October 1985. I cracked wise in the original post that “Mssrs. Rose & Kahler had the last laugh at this ad,” but it seems Washburn’s device has a devoted underground following. In fact, PG reader Steve Sparks operates a site devoted to the tremolo, “a place to host the docs/pics I’ve found,” as he puts it.

So, take a look at some schematics, fan photos and Mr. Sparks himself rocking an ’85 Washburn at washburnwonderbar.com.

Right here.

Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal’s 10th full length album Little Brother is Watching is on the way and the erstwhile Guns N’ Roses guitarist gave Guitar World a glimpse inside his world. Aside from addressing the writing and recording processes and his current gear, Thal revealed his state of mind:

(Charity) is everything. Over the last few years, I’ve begun to figure out what matters and have started making a lot of decisions. I would rather play for 10 little kids and put a smile on their faces instead of playing for 100,000 people. The world might not agree, but that’s me and that’s how I’m going to live.

Read more and check out video of a very Bumblefoot solo from his album’s title track at GW.

Right here.

The Paul Reed Smith factory in Stevensville, Maryland is now offering public tours. From a press release, via Guitar Noize:

(V)isitors will get a firsthand look at PRS Guitars’ processes, instruments, and amplifiers from raw wood or blank chassis form to finished guitar or amplifier. The guided tour, which lasts approximately 90 minutes, takes scheduled visitors through the electric guitar manufacturing line, amplifier department, and acoustic shop.

Read more and see pics of PRS guitars in various states of completion at Guitar Noize.

Right here.

The famed 1954 Les Paul Custom “Black Beauty” formerly owned and played by the man himself sold at auction for $335,500 this week to Indianapolis Colts football franchise owner Jim Irsay. Irsay’s “guitar curator” Christopher McKinney placed the bid and came away with the iconic instrument. Speaking to the New York Times, McKinney summed the guitar up as follows, via Michael Molenda’s blog at Guitar Player:

We know the importance of the guitar historically. This guitar was used by Les in recordings, in television. It was his main guitar for innovations. It shows his thinking and progress as an inventor. A lot of the things that were done to this guitar went on to become industry standard.

Read much more, including the tale of the guitar’s controversial legacy, at Guitar Player.

Right here.

Guitarist Sam Andrew, founding member of Big Brother & the Holding Company, has died at 73. According to the band’s Facebook page, via Billboard:

Yesterday, ten weeks after his heart attack and the open-heart surgery that followed it, Sam lost his gallant fight to hold onto the life he lived so well. He lived his life in music and art and a loving marriage. It doesn’t get much better than that.

Read more at Billboard.
Right here.

The list of guitars that have become as iconic as their owners is short: B.B. King’s “Lucille,” Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstrat,” and certainly Willie Nelson’s battered Martin known as “Trigger” come to mind. Rolling Stone has released a mini-documentary focused on Nelson’s instrument which, according to Chron.com reveals:

Trigger and Nelson met in 1969 when Nelson needed a guitar that had the same tone as the one used by influential guitarist Django Reinhardt, one of his idols. He named the guitar Trigger after Roy Rogers’ famous steed. In a way the guitar Trigger has been just like Rogers’ trusty horse.

Read more and watch the piece at Chron.com.

Right here.

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