Here’s a great package recently featured on the absurdly robust Make Weird Music site. MWM mastermind Anthony Garone and guitar electronics guru Ed Heisler had the opportunity to install the latter’s Mad Hatter SVST-HSH Terminator Kit into Steve Vai‘s signature Ibanez JEM, the guitar named Evo. Like … the real Evo itself. Here’s what Anthony had to say about the handoff:

It was a little nerve-wracking leaving the venue with one of the most valuable guitars on the planet. I joked with Ed that I would rather Steve handed us a bag with 1 million dollars cash because cash is replaceable. I think Ed double-checked his homeowner’s insurance after he brought EVO home.

Yeah, no shit.

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“It’s like Evo has a bigger set of lungs.”

If you head over to MWM you can watch a mini documentary which chronicles the work done and reveals incredible details of the iconic axe inside and out. It’s a real treat for Vai fans and guitar tech wonks. Go see it all.

Right here.

Will you just check out the sound of these three guys? Oops, sorry―that’s just Ian Ethan Case playing both necks of his Ovation. This is absolutely bewitching stuff.

Learn more about this innovator at his own site.

Right here.

Well, this is shocking: Chris Cornell is dead at 52. A solo artist in his own right, Cornell was, of course, known as vocalist and guitarist for Soundgarden, Temple of the Dog, and Audioslave. Here’s an excerpt from a statement Cornell’s representative gave CNN:

His wife Vicky and family were shocked to learn of his sudden and unexpected passing. They would like to thank his fans for their continuous love and loyalty and ask that their privacy be respected at this time.

Read the full article right here.

Sharing a post from the Pointy-related Echoflower blog, an entire measure of Zappa music.

This is classic Zappa, full of chromatic twists and turns, arpeggio inversions battling each other in parallel harmony and other madness that defies clear categorization.

Play along with (one measure of) “I Come From Nowhere.”

Right here.

7-string wizard Dave Weiner is known as a recording artist and educator as well as being a key member of Steve Vai’s touring band. He’s currently gearing up for Vai’s Passion & Warfare 25th Anniversary Tour and is sharing the process on his YouTube channel. Let’s check out “I Would Love To,” shall we?

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Pointy guitars. Get it?

Is this the most useful thing you’ll see on the web today? Probably. Guitar World is sharing a helpful tutorial called “Eight Steps to Becoming a Legendary Hair Metal Guitarist.” They focus on techniques (tapping, pinch harmonics) and stagecraft (jumps and gestures), as well as, perhaps the most essential element, gear. What else would we highlight here besides headstocks?

Some say Eighties headstocks were used to scare off stalkers in the crowd. Others say they were meant to remind the lead singer to sleep with one eye open. Regardless of the actual reason, you’ll need to use razor-sharp headstocks that are strong enough to cut through flesh.

Get your hairspray and get over to GW. 

Right here.

The venerable Guitar Player has posted a list of “The 10 Most Iconic Guitar Amps.” You could probably run down the roster yourself: Fender Twin Reverb, Vox AC 30, Fender Bassman et al. I mean, hey―they’re iconic for good reasons. Here’s what GP says about another legendary amp, the Marshall 1959 Super Lead 100 Watt Plexi:

Introduced in 1965, the amplifier included four inputs, two channels, 100 watts of searing power and a Plexiglas faceplate (hence “Plexi”). Matched with 4×12 cabinets, the 1959 Super Lead helped to popularize the ‘Marshall stack.’ The amplifier can be famously seen being played by Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.

Read about all 10 and see some videos at GP.

Right here.