Tributes to B.B. King continue to appear from across the music world in the wake of the blues legend’s passing. One perhaps unexpected source of praise is The Dillinger Escape Plan guitarist Ben Weinman, who says King’s minimalist phrasing had an impact on his band’s dense blocks of sound. From Metal Hammer:

B.B. knew how to use space. Where he didn’t play spoke to you more than where he did play. That’s what really brought the feeling. That’s what I’ve always thought about with Dillinger. Some of the less complex moments speak to you the most, because of everything around them that’s so crazy.

Read more at MH.

Right here.

Now that it’s all over, all I can do is wish you well.

This one really stings: Guitar giant Riley B. “Blues Boy” King has departed. Of late the legend had fought a well publicized health battle before passing at 89. The New York Times boils B.B. down like this:

Mr. King married country blues to big-city rhythms and created a sound instantly recognizable to millions: a stinging guitar with a shimmering vibrato, notes that coiled and leapt like an animal, and a voice that groaned and bent with the weight of lust, longing and lost love.

Listen to some blues today and read more at NYT.

Right here.

Here’s a nice live take on the track “Bomb” from Tom Verlaine and company, ca. 1987.

The current realm of country music is as full of hot guitarists as any other. One only need listen to a few masterful measures played by Brent Mason or Brad Paisley to confirm this. Yet guitar solos are being excised from singles to appease an audience hungry not for artful playing, but seemingly for another verse filled with cliches that have been tired since Steve Goodman and John Prine lampooned them in “You Never Even Called My by My Name” in 1975. Billboard is running an insightful article on this topic wherein consultant Joel Raab puts it like this:

The listeners’ attention spans are shorter and shorter, and if they start getting bored with whatever it is that we’re doing it’s too easy for them to go somewhere else. So it’s really about forward momentum on the radio station. Is that guitar part moving everything forward? If it is, great. If it’s not, then maybe it needs to be edited.

Spoken like a true bean counter.

You can read more (and be sickened) at Billboard.

Right here.

Longtime Exodus guitarist Gary Holt, who has occupied the Slayer guitar mantle since Jeff Hanneman’s, death has discussed his predecessor in an interview with Loudwire. Here’s his take on playing Hanneman’s parts, via Blabbermouth:

He just had his own style, because it wasn’t textbook. It was very off the cuff and he did [things] the way he wanted to. I’ll keep signature little melodies and stuff, especially in the early songs. (B)ut I don’t think that’s doing him justice, trying to copy him.

Read more and view the interview at Blabbermouth.

Right here.

The incredible Joe Pass takes the Leigh Harline and Ned Washington classic for a spin. That tone.

Metallica came of age in the golden days of cassette trading, a time long before the Internet when finding new music involved a different type of network, composed of like minded individuals. In that spirit, the band’s 1982 demo No Life ’til Leather has been given the reissue treatment in honor of Record Store Day. Kirk Hammett (who had yet to replace original lead guitarist Dave Mustaine on those recordings) told Guitar World that even he was surprised by the move:

When the idea was floated around about releasing the No Life ‘til Leather demo as a cassette, I thought they were joking. Then the next thing you know I’m holding a fucking cassette!

Read more at GW.
Right here.

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