outbound


Guitarist Chris Stein was making more art than just Blondie records during the 1970s, as the new book Chris Stein / Negative: Me, Blondie, and the Advent of Punk shows. From Smithsonian.com:

After attending art school in the late 1960s, Stein was drawn to a fertile downtown music scene of New York City. Sonically creative as well as visually, he met his musical soulmate Debbie Harry … The rising new wave/punk scene of that time provided ample subject matter for Stein’s lens. He had special access to his fellow musicians, shooting portraits of performers including Joey Ramone, Iggy Pop, Joan Jett and of course, Debbie Harry.

Read more, including a conversation with Stein, at Smithsonian.
Right here.

 

 

Jon Herington has played lead guitar in Steely Dan for 15 years and is a devoted student of the band’s original recordings. He recently revealed to Digital Trends a personal favorite lead break from the original Dan albums:

(H)ands down, my favorite solo on any Steely Dan record is Larry Carlton’s Third World Man. It’s one of the greatest pop guitar solos ever recorded. It has a great shape, the whole way it moves and climaxes.

Read more from Jon Herington and listen to Larry Carlton’s solo at Digital Trends.

Right here.

A ban on the use of steel string guitars in British jails has been lifted due in part to an initiative led by guitarist/songwriter Billy Bragg. According to Uncut:

The campaign was also led by Cardiff West MP Kevin Brennan … Musicians including Radiohead’s Ed O’Brien and Philip Selway, Elbow’s Guy Garvey, Pink Floyd’s David Gilmour and Johnny Marr also supported the campaign to overturn the ban.

And Bragg himself notes:

As an incentive to engage in rehabilitation individual access to steel strung guitars can really help the atmosphere on a prison wing.

Read more at Uncut.

Right here.

From the nylon string hollow body to the overdriven Les Paul, all guitars—and musical instruments—operate according to the principles of physics. Physicist and guitarist Dr. David Robert Grimes, a postdoctoral researcher in Oxford University’s Department of Oncology, has applied the science of his day job to the techniques of the guitar in a new article published in the journal PLOS ONE. How devoted to the study was he? Here’s Dr. Grimes, via the Dublin City University website:

I took one of my oldest guitars down to the engineering lab to one of the people I knew there and explained that I wanted to strip it down to do this experiment. We had to accurately bend the strings to different extents and measure the frequency produced. He was a musician too and looked at me with abject horror. But we both knew it needed to be done – We put some nails into my guitar for science.

Read more at DCU’s site.

Right here.

July 2014 has been an atrocious month for legendary guitarists: On the heels of Johnny Winter’s departure, famed Lou Reed and Alice Cooper collaborator Dick Wagner has died at 71. From The Detroit Free Press:

(Wagner) had famously overcome a series of medical issues during the past decade, retraining himself on guitar after a stroke paralyzed his left arm. He succumbed to respiratory failure at Scottsdale (Ariz.) Healthcare Shea Medical Center, where he had been in intensive care for the past two weeks following a cardiac procedure.

Aside from his high profile stints with the above, Wagner was also a widely recorded studio player, appearing (with various levels of public credit) on albums by Kiss and Aerosmith.

Read more at the Free Press.

Right here.

 

It’s amazing what you can buy if you have piles of money. For example, a Martin D-28 that once belonged to Elvis Presley will go to auction in Memphis next month. The guitar is currently owned by Greg Page, founder of the children’s group The Wiggles and mega Elvis collector. Despite the fact that this item and the others to be listed don’t originate from the Presley estate, they’ve all been verified as legitimate. According to Today.com:

Everything up for sale has been given the stamp of approval from the new Graceland-affiliated authentication and appraisal service, Graceland Authenticated.

Read more and take a look at the Martin at Today.com.

Right here.

The amazingly robust reddit.com/r/guitar community is hosting an interesting conversation about guitar prices, “Is there a point where a guitar just becomes simply over priced?.” In an age where you can spend more on a Gibson reissue than on a decent used car, the answer seems to be a resounding, OF COURSE. But the opposite position has a surprising amount of support. User nobodygivesafuckk (!) describes a fleeting meeting with Vince Gill’s $12,000 Kelton Swade strat:

5 years and hundreds of guitars played later, nothing else has come anywhere close, both tone-wise as well as playability. I got to play it for about 3 hours, and to this day that memory is still my most vivid one when it comes to guitars. I’m sorry, but nothing even comes close. So yeah, I guess you get what you pay for.

Read along or join the discussion at Reddit.

Right here.

Next Page »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 32 other followers